HackDig : Dig high-quality web security articles for hacker

Why Brand Trumps Tech in C-Level Conversations

2017-04-17 14:30
Brand reputation, not technical tools, should be the focus of the CIO's conversations with board members about the importance of security.

CIOs have a spot at the executive table but struggle to hold security-focused conversations with people sitting around it. The problem: It's tough to convey the importance of security before a major breach.

"Security is like life insurance," says Larry Bonfante, founder at CIO Bench Coach. "Nobody cares about it until something has already happened."

This "seat at the table" comes with the responsibility of knowing how to communicate with board members. Instead of explaining the nitty-gritty details of security tools, CIOs should step back to think about risk mitigation and brand reputation.

Companies can invest millions in security and attackers will still get in, Bonfante explains. Part of a CIO's job is to evaluate the probability of an attack based on factors like geography and industry. When they know where the risk is highest, they can determine how much to invest, where to invest it, and how to explain that risk to board members.

The key is to frame risk in a certain way so leaders understand why attackers would specifically target them. If the business understands a risk, they'll increase the budget to fight it.

Bonfante explains his argument in the context of the US Open. With 70,000 people in attendance, broad media coverage, and location in a major city, it's easy to see why such a major event would be a "prime target." Unfortunately, he says, many leaders wouldn't view the situation from a similar perspective.

Brand reputation is powerful leverage in conversations about risk. CIOs should view themselves as educators and elevate the conversation about reputation, not about technology, Bonfante explains.

A CIO's goal should not be to help business leaders understand the latest DDoS attack happened, or how a new firewall will work, but the effects attack could potentially have on their organization. Companies value brand reputation. In the case of the US Open, an attack could mean fewer attendees in future years -- and a significant drop in profit.

"Nobody thinks it's going to happen to them," says Bonfante of security breaches. "Make them understand that this really does happen; that dark consequences could happen."

Security discussions are getting easier as more major breaches are publicized, but most CIOs still face pushback from enterprise teams when voicing their concerns. Each year, they will need to remind people about the risks they face and keep concerns on their radar.

"It's not a one-time sell," Bonfante continues. "It's a constant sell, it's a constant education process, and you never get as much as you want."

He explains how CIOs may be required to speak in terms the business will understand, but there isn't a similar expectation for board members to learn technical terms. If they want to communicate risks to the business, CIOs are entirely responsible for shaping the conversation.

While technology shouldn't lead these discussions, Bonfante recommends being prepared with the technical details of threats and tools -- just in case.

[Larry Bonfante will be speaking about "Competencies of the new CIO" during Interop ITX, May 15-19, at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas. To learn more about his presentation, other Interop security tracks, or to register click on the live links.]

Related Content


Source: SR=cm_?8368231/di-d/d/snoitasrevnoc-level-c-ni-hcet-spmurt-dnarb-yhw/ksir/moc.gnidaerkrad.www

Read:1952 | Comments:0 | Tags:No Tag

“Why Brand Trumps Tech in C-Level Conversations”0 Comments

Submit A Comment

Name:

Email:

Blog :

Verification Code:

Announce

Share high-quality web security related articles with you:)

Tools

Tag Cloud